Mongol by Sergey Bodrov

Genre:
Drama
Year:
2007
Language:
Format:
120 minutes
Starring:
Tadanabu Asano
Honglei Sun
Khulan Chuluun
Odnyam Odsuren
Directed by:
Sergey Bodrov
Produced by:
CTB Film Company, Russia; Andreyevsky Flag Film Company, Russia; X-Filme Creative Pool, Germany; Kinofabrika GmbH
Genghis Khan is one of the most famous leaders in world history. He was the creator of a vast Mongolian Empire who conquered half of the globe.

Sergei Bodrov has fulfilled a long-time dream in bringing the heart-wrenching story of one of the great rulers of the Mongol Dynasty to the screen. The tale of how a young boy ascended to become Khan centres Bodrov's epic tale of love and betrayal. Mongol reaches Shakespearean heights in its narrative account of a family that is torn apart, cast aside, and eventually restored to power. A young boy tests his courage against forces determined to destroy him and, through sheer force of will, wins out.
Nine-year-old Temudgin sets off with his father, a khan, to search for a bride. Travelling across the region's stark and beautiful tundra, Temudgin sees a girl whom he proclaims to be his wife, though his choice runs counter to his father's wishes. But Temudgin's life instantly changes when a group of Tartars poison his father. Even though he is next in line to rule, the rest of the tribe refuses to accept leadership from a young boy. They cast out his entire family, forcing them to eke out a meagre existence.
An epic of courage and resourcefulness follows, as the boy becomes a man (Tadanobu Asano), finds the girl whom he had chosen as his bride all those years ago, and gradually reasserts his claim to the leadership of his kingdom. Temudgin's picaresque journey sees him descend to the depths of slavery before exacting his revenge and reascending to the heights of power he knew as a young boy. This saga plays out against the stunning landscapes of Central Asia, where tribal loyalties rule and violent warfare trumps other means of resolving differences.
The grand canvas of the storyline clearly stimulates Bodrov, and he relishes the visual opportunities afforded in the scenes of realistic warfare. But he also finds ample time for the quiet moments between Temudgin, his wife and his beloved mother. Family forms the bedrock of behaviour, and Bodrov constantly returns to this idea in re-imagining a vital period of Mongol history.

www.mongolmovie.net